Troubleshooting: Missing Private key in Windows Servers

Like the majority of server systems you will install your SSL certificate on the same server where your Certificate Signing Request (CSR) was created. This is because your private key will always be left on the server system where the CSR was originally created. With Microsoft systems the private key is hidden away and will only appear once the CSR pending request has been completed. When using Exchange to process the pending request and install a SSL certificate there should be a option available to do this. Typically if there is no option to “complete” the pending request it usually means the following. The CSR was never created on the exchange system that you are currently on. Note: If the […]

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Windows Server IIS/Exchange – Intermediate Installation

You have successfully installed your SSL Certificate on a windows server system although you might be having some trust issues on certain browsers or applications are not fully trusting your SSL Certificate. This may be due to a lack of an intermediate CA certificate file that helps Chain the Trust to your clients browsers or systems. Or,  instead of installing a pkcs#7 certificate that has the intermediate embedded in the server certificates code you installed an x509 version of your certificate which does not have the intermediate within it. In order to import your SSL Certificate Intermediate CA Certificate perform the following. Step 1: Downloading Intermediate CA certificate: If your intermediate CA certificate for your product is not in the body of […]

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How to move certificate from IIS to FortiMail

Windows servers use .pfx/.p12 files to contain the public key file (SSL Certificate) and its unique private key file. The Certificate Authority (CA) provides you with your SSL Certificate (public key file). You use your server to generate the associated private key file where the CSR was created. You need both the public key and private keys for an SSL certificate to work properly on any system. Windows uses the pfx/p12 file to contain these two keys; therefore, if you need to transfer your SSL certificate from one server to another or take the certificate from IIS to FortiMail you will need to create this file first.  To move a certificate from Windows IIS 7.0 – 8.5  with its private key […]

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How to move SSL certificate from IIS to Lync 2013

Windows servers use .pfx/.p12 files to contain the public key file (SSL Certificate) and its unique private key file. The Certificate Authority (CA) provides you with your SSL Certificate (public key file). You use your server to generate the associated private key file where the CSR was created. You need both the public key and private keys for an SSL certificate to work properly on any system. Windows uses the pfx/p12 file to contain these two keys; therefore, if you need to transfer your SSL certificate from one server to another or store it someplace for safe keeping you need to create a .pfx backup. To move you SSL  certificate from a Windows IIS to Lync 2013 system  with its private […]

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Export and Backup a PFX certificate from Windows IIS 7.0 – 8.5

Windows servers use .pfx/.p12 files to contain the public key file (SSL Certificate) and its unique private key file. The Certificate Authority (CA) provides you with your SSL Certificate (public key file). You use your server to generate the associated private key file where the CSR was created. You need both the public key and private keys for an SSL certificate to work properly on any system. Windows uses the pfx/p12 file to contain these two keys; therefore, if you need to transfer your SSL certificate from one server to another or store it someplace for safe keeping you need to create a .pfx backup. To backup and Export a certificate from Windows IIS 7.0 – 8.5  with its private key […]

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How to move SSL Certificate from IIS to F5 BigIP 11 Loadbalancer

Windows servers use .pfx files to contain the public key file (SSL Certificate) and its unique private key file. The Certificate Authority (CA) provides you with your SSL Certificate (public key file). You use your server to generate the associated private key file where the CSR was created. You need both the public and private keys for an SSL Certificate to work properly; therefore, if you need to transfer your SSL certificate from one server to another, you need to create a .pfx backup first. Then import into F5 Big-IP To move perform an Export & Import SSL Certificate from IIS to F5 Big IP 11.x perform the following. Step 1:  Create an MMC Snap-in for Managing Certificates: Start > run > […]

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