How To Move SSL Ceritifcate From Windows To Mitel MiCollab MSL Server

Like the majority of server systems you will install your SSL certificate on the same server where your Certificate Signing Request (CSR) was created. Your private key will always be left on the server system where the CSR was originally created. Your SSL certificate will not work without this private key file. We will assume that this is the original system. MiCollab systems have the capability of importing a pfx/p12 file which is a keypair file that Microsoft Systems like IIS/Exchange uses that contains both the SSL Certificate and it’s Private key. To export your installed SSL Certificate with its private key from a Windows System to Mitel MiCollab MSL Server perform the following. Step 1:  Create an MMC Snap-in for […]

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How To Enable Or Import A Root Certifciate In Windows Systems Using MMC.

Depending on the circumstance you may be getting mixed results of browser certificate trust or for whatever reason are experiencing an issue with Cross Root Certificates or warning of not fully trusting a chaining root. Cross Root Certificate where used back in the day by some Certificate Authorities to help certificate trust to older outdated server systems, but due to liability of allowing certificate trust to these systems that practice is no longer practiced. SSL Certificates are now used to modernize and update industry standards not give loop wholes around staying secure. To bypass a Cross Root Certificate warning it is a matter of making sure a new updated root is installed on the system in question and that all purposes […]

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How To Export an SSL Certificate With Private Key (pfx) Using MMC On Windows

Windows servers use .pfx/.p12 files to contain the public key file (SSL Certificate) and its unique private key file.  The Certificate Authority (CA) provides you with your SSL Certificate (public key file). You use your server to generate the associated private key file where the CSR was created. You need both the public key and private keys for an SSL certificate to work properly on any system. Windows uses the pkcs#12 (pfx/p12) file to contain these two keys and another of intermediate certificates along the chain of trust; therefore, if you need to transfer your SSL certificate from one Windows system to another that uses PFX files or store it someplace for safe keeping you need to create a pkcs#12 (pfx/p12) backup. […]

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How to move SSL Certificate from MMC to MMC

Not all websites or applications use IIS or Exchange for its SSL configurations, but they may refer to the Windows MMC certificate stores for their configurations and may need to move an SSL certificate from one system to another. Windows servers use .pfx/.p12 files to contain the public key file (SSL Certificate) and its unique private key file.  The Certificate Authority (CA) provides you with your SSL Certificate (public key file). You use your server to generate the associated private key file where the CSR was created. You need both the public key and private keys for an SSL certificate to work properly on any system. Windows uses the pkcs#12 (pfx/p12) file to contain these two keys and another of […]

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How to create a MMC Snap-In for troubleshooting certificates.

Microsoft Management Console (MMC) is the management console that is used to configure, manipulate, create, and fix services on a windows system in the back end that you probably wont be able to do with any front end application. It is used heavily to troubleshoot matters related to SSL certificates on Windows systems. Open up a MMC snap in by performing the instructions below. Step 1:  Create an MMC Snap-in for Managing Certificates on a Windows server system: Start > run > MMC. Go into the Console Tab > File > Add/Remove Snap-in. Click on Add > Click on Certificates and click on Add. Choose Computer Account > Next. Note: When troubleshooting browser certificates such as client certificates, email signing certificates, CodeSigning, etc.. you will choose […]

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Windows Server IIS/Exchange – Intermediate Installation

You have successfully installed your SSL Certificate on a windows server system although you might be having some trust issues on certain browsers or applications are not fully trusting your SSL Certificate. This may be due to a lack of an intermediate CA certificate file that helps Chain the Trust to your clients browsers or systems. Or,  instead of installing a pkcs#7 certificate that has the intermediate embedded in the server certificates code you installed an x509 version of your certificate which does not have the intermediate within it. In order to import your SSL Certificate Intermediate CA Certificate perform the following. Step 1: Downloading Intermediate CA certificate: If your intermediate CA certificate for your product is not in the body of […]

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